Mindshifts

I read a review of Speed of Trust written by Rex Miller (author of the Millenium Matrix) this morning. Miller states, "If you think TRUST is a squishy concept, something you either have or don't or nothing a CFO can add up at the bottom of a spread sheet - read Covey's book The Speed of Trust. Miller goes on to say, "Trust is the mindshift." (If you haven't picked it up yet, do so. It is a read with high epiphany potential.)

I finished another book this weekend which has the power of mindshift on the spiritual side. Static, by Ron Martoia tackles some pretty tough theological issues. I love Ron's phrase "point of sale" Christianity. He talks about the message of Jesus way beyond the "saved vs. lost" conversation.

In both the case of Rex Miller and Ron Martoia, it is an interesting thing to read the books of people you know. I read Ron's book against the backdrop of a conversation we had at dinner one night four years ago with Nancy-the-Insightful and David-the-Artist-Pastor where I got to explore some of my own theological views that my seminary-trained friends would be horrified to know I believe in deeply.

The reason I got to explore those ideas was because none of the people at the table treated me like I was falling from grace for believing what I believe. We actually got to talk and for the very first time, I was able to ask questions openly about the things I was wondering about without being sold a party line. Which--in many aspects--is what Static is all about. It is hard to process what God is doing in an environment where someone is trying to sell you something or "close the deal."

That, I'm afraid is an American concept--not a Christian one. (Don't take that as a slam to America. I love being American. We are innovative. Creative. We aren't afraid to take risks. But, we also grew up with infomercials, vestiges of the temperance movement and televangelists and that influences how we interpret scripture...at least a little. My thought, not a quote from the book, so don't e-mail Ron with flak about it.)

Static is well worth reading and the concepts worth grappling with. Best of all, it is written in conversational language. After all, if the concepts are difficult, the language shouldn't be.
© Random Cathy
Maira Gall