Rubber meet Road

I had breakfast with Laura-the-American last week. We were talking about hiring practices and she made a brilliant statement.

"Everyone is ideological in their thinking but not in their behavior."

She was referencing the hiring practice of asking applicants the question "Tell me about a time..." rather than "what are you like?"

When people are asked about who they are, they typically give ideological answers, but when people are asked to tell stories about their work life, their behavior in the scenario candidly reveals what is real. (Laura said the interviews are long and that by the end people are sharing things without realizing what they are revealing.)

"Everyone is ideological in their thinking but not in their behavior."

I think this is actually best revealed in our religious beliefs.  We can believe deeply in the high-goals of love and forgiveness, but our commitment to those goals is quickly revealed in our personal lives and the way we treat others. It also plays out in our political views. For example, I can believe in services for the poor, but if I'm not giving to organizations that are serving them (or even tipping the working poor), then it isn't that important to me. Or I can believe that human trafficking is wrong, but if I'm engaging in pornography then my concern isn't real.

"Everyone is ideological in their thinking but not in their behavior."

What if one of the most important things we can do is create alignment?  To work to get continuity between our beliefs and our practices?  Better yet, in places where there is not alignment, we have to be honest with ourselves. We become far less judgmental when we see our own gaps.
© Random Cathy
Maira Gall